What’s up with the Rec | Pro Split?

Truth be told, it’s been a long time coming.  Yep you guessed it – avalanche education in the United States has just made a major shift.  As an educator that values consistency in teaching and outcomes for students – I’d say the avalanche education Rec | Pro split is for the better. Thanks impart to a partnership between the American Avalanche Association (AAA) and the leading avalanche education providers throughout the nation including the American Institute for Avalanche Research and Education (AIARE), American Avalanche Institute (AAI), and the National Avalanche School the avalanche education industry will be moving towards more continuity (similar to our Canadian neighbors).

What actually is the Rec | Pro Split, and why is it necessary?

The former avalanche education progression was quite cumbersome, which included the Level 1, Level 2, Level 3 progression for all users despite individualized needs.  Blending the recreation user with the professional is challenging for both the educator and student alike due to the varying needs related to course content and student outcomes.   Needless to say, we were thrilled to hear that these two “tracks” will now be separated.  Avalanche education providers, like SOLE’s AIARE avalanche education program, will now offer Rec track avalanche education course offerings, which are required to progress to the Pro track whereas Pro track offerings will be offered by the over-arching providers like AIARE, AAI, etc (see the image below for more information).

With these shifts, we look forward to more positive outcomes for participants that take our AIARE courses this season and have needed the Pro | Rec split in the industry for some time.  In addition, to the advantages of separating the two avalanche education user-types, providers and the governing body (AAA) have come together to create more consistency across the industry, akin to what has occurred with wilderness medicine providers and the Wilderness Medical Society.  The results will surely be impactful for all.  Instead of recreational users getting bogged down in the microscopic details of snow crystallography they will now be able to focus on the concepts that really matter at that specific level.  Conversely, avalanche professionals (forecasters, ski guides, etc) will now have the opportunity to “geek out” when needed and have a common interest while doing so!

Some take home points…

  • What is the difference between AAA and AIARE, and how does SOLE fit in the mix?  In simple terms, AAA develops the guidelines for avalanche education providers in the United States.  AIARE is an approved avalanche education provider and takes the guidelines developed by AAA and has developed rigorous, standardized training and curriculum for both pro courses and rec courses which is evidence-based.   This is exactly why SOLE chose the AIARE avalanche education program.  SOLE’s AIARE Field Instructors are avalanche education professionals and besides teaching AIARE courses for SOLE in the winter often work ski guiding, avalanche forecasting, or ski patrolling.  SOLE is an AIARE approved avalanche education provider.
  • Which track is for me, Rec or Pro?  Well, it depends.  Recreational avalanche education is for those who want to make sound decisions in the backcountry.  For example, developing essential skills like determining if you should ski the slope or not is something that you would explore in the Rec track.  On the other hand, the Pro track is for those who would like to pursue or those who are actively working in a professional setting.  Examples include, but not limited to, mitigation work, avalanche forecasting, ski guiding, etc.  It is important to note,  Rec coursework is required to progress to Pro Course offerings.  Also, Pro courses are longer in duration and include a formal evaluation as part of the course.
  • Where should I begin my avalanche education?  As old adage, “why fix something if it ain’t broken” rings true. A Rec Level 1 Course is a great starting point, as well as, the BRAND SPANKING NEW one-day Avalanche Rescue course.  Afterwards, if you would like to progress you will need to demonstrate experience in the avalanche field.  Most avalanche education providers recommend a solid year further developing your skills after taking your Level 1, which will allow you to transition to the Rec Level 2 or Pro 1 course depending on specific needs and skills.  The Avalanche Rescue course is a pre-requisite for the Rec Level 2 or Pro 1.
  • If I already have my Level 2, can I just transition to the Pro track? Not so fast.  You will need to take what is called a Bridge Course with an accompanying exam to achieve Pro 1 Certification. This Bridge Course will evaluate your skills from the previous Level 2 training. It is important to note, this opportunity will be offered briefly, and after the initial two years of the new progression, someone with an old Level 2 will need to take and complete a Pro 1 course to pursue the Pro track – so now’s the time to get on it!

SOLE will continue to offer the full breadth of Rec courses for the 2017 – 2018 season, including the brand new Avalanche Rescue course, women’s specific, youth-specific, and adult co-ed Rec Level 1 course offerings!  So stay tuned-in and refresh often on our website and social media sites.  For more information on these courses and to register for any of our avalanche education programs click here.

Hope to see you on the snow,DennisonTeaching
Dennison Webb, M.A.
Founder | Executive Director

 

Why should you ‘Plan Ahead & Prepare’

The backcountry is as unpredictable as it gets.  Like other remote regions throughout the United States, living and traveling in the backcountry of the Inland Northwest often results in interacting with the dynamic nature of the land we are traveling within.  These factors are delivered from experiencing unpredictable weather patterns, possible wildlife encounters, forging swift cold rivers, traversing in avalanche terrain, navigating wildfires, missing rock fall, and so many other factors – all of which are simply out of our control.  All we can do, is use the skills we have developed and our best judgment to not be irresponsible or complacent.  The beauty in that which we might fear are the lifelong lessons that these moments create.  In fact, it’s why we go out there to RE-create, and furthermore, it’s why SOLE uses these environs as our preferred classroom setting.   It is in these novel educational settings SOLE participants are provided real challenges, with real consequences and as a result are able to truly develop personal character and grit, while simultaneously providing opportunity for those we serve to master outdoor skill and leadership competencies.

Because of the stated unknowns, as our partners at The Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Skills and Ethics often say, it’s best to Plan Ahead and Prepare for what may arise.  Many outdoor enthusiast do not adequately prepare before venturing out. Best case scenario, they become a case study for us to consider to not repeat the same mistakes. Unfortunately, it doesn’t always end well.

Why should we Plan Ahead and Prepare?

Wildfires are unpredictable and may require signifcant re-routing. Photo credit: Inciweb

Let’s investigate further based on a recent article from Rich Landers of The Spokesman-Review that underscores the “why”and serves as an excellent case study.  Click here to read the article for a personal account of being unprepared in the backcountry.

As we can see, more than 100 individuals were trapped, uprepared in what could have been a potential deadly situation.  As luck would have it, there was someone that did have military training, cell phone coverage, and a smart phone application all of which assisted in getting the group out safely. What would have occured had the technology failed and/or they not had the leadership to assist them?  Obviously, the outcomes would have been much more chatostrophic.  So that is why, when dealing with any backcountry environment we need to Plan Ahead and Prepare, so we can thrive, not just survive.

 

How to ‘thrive’ not just survive…

First, let’s take a look at the 4 considerations that are critical to any backcountry user.

  1. Create and use a Travel Plan.
  2. Understand what to do when lost.
  3. Utilize an effective layering system.
  4. Pack the 13 Essential

Knowing how to use a topo map and compass is essential for any backcountry user – especially when technology fails.

Simply put, a Travel Plan IS your first line of defense.  It let’s folks know where you are going, and how long you will be there, and when you will return.  When heading out to the backcountry it’s always a good idea to leave a plan of your trip with friends or families.

Good info to include in the Travel Plan:

  1. Estimated Time of Departure (ETD) – when you are leaving.
  2. Destination – include trail numbers, road access, etc.
  3. Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA) – when you are returning back.
  4. Copy of Route – include maps as appropriate.

What should I pack?  

Along with the 13 essentials (see below), but also appropriate clothing and gear to deal with inclement weather should the need arise. Layering systems are the norm for backcountry travellers consisting of largely polypropylene and wool clothing fabrics as the go-to. Yes, even though it’s hot during the day and it’s summer you can STILL get hypothermic.  An effective layering system can provide effective thermo-regulation allowing the backcountry traveler to stay cool and warm when necessary. It is important to note, cotton is not a great fabric for when the mercury begins to dip and will only serve to strip heat away from your body once wet promoting heat-loss and possibly leading to hypothermia. We will explore heat-loss and how to regulate it effectively in the coming submissions. A good consideration for most days is while it may be hot most summer days, when traveling in the mountains it can go from hot to cold and wet rather quickly.

An effective layering system is a must any time of the year in the backcountry to deal with the cure balls that good ‘ole Mother Nature delivers. Photo Credit: outdoorgearlab.com

Understanding the Layering System…

So, with not know exactly what the weather is going to do, a simple clothing/layering system for your upper and lower body for backcountry excursions throughout the year in mountainous regions should include:

  1. Sun/bug protection (top/bottom). Convertible zip-off pants are great. They provide adequate sun/bug protection and can be zipped off to keep cool when needed. Also, long sleeve button up sun shirts are great for the same reason. Often, some models are vented to be more comfortable in hot weather while also provide adequate coverage. It is also a great idea to consider a sun hat (baseball style or wide-brimmed – the later has better protection), sunglasses with a retaining strap, and most certainly sun block! Like inclement weather, sun itself is a real environmental threat so when venturing out into the backcountry we want to prepare accordingly.
  2. A wicking layer (top/bottom). Lightweight polypropylene is ideal. It’s designed to wick the moisture directly from your skin to the outer layers and dries quickly when wet.
  3. Insulating layer (top). A common mid-weight fleece works well. This layer will serve to trap air and keep you warm when needed. You can find them at most gear shops and even thrift stores. Wool will also work well, which can be found at Army Surplus stores.  You say it’s hot.  What happens when you have to spend the night, and the temps drop.  Yep, it can even snow in the summer in the lower 48.
  4. A waterproof shell (top/bottom). “Rubberized” coated nylon works well when not active; they trap heat when moving versus transferring heat from the body – causing you to sweat. Again, the goal of a layering system is to effectively trap and move heat when necessary. Therefore, we recommend a waterproof-breathable shell layer. Also, it is important to note, there are other options out there on the market that work well besides Gore-Tex, which are far more affordable so we recommend shopping around.
  5. A wool or fleece hat. While it’s a myth that you body loses most of your heat through your head you can transfer a fair amount of heat there if not covered so we recommend throwing one in your pack.

A simple day backpack can provide ample room for all the gear that you will need when things go from bad to worse.

13 Essentials…

The following 13 items should be included in your pack at all times in case of an emergency or if you are unexpectedly caught out overnight.  You may not use all of the essentials on every trip, but they could keep you alive in an emergency.

  1. Topo Map – Let’s face it technology like iPhones and GPS’s are great, but they fail. A topographical map is fail proof method to navigate the backcountry.  Learn how to use the map efficiently or it will add needless weight. Place it in a plastic zip lock bag and carry a pencil to triangulate.
  2. Compass – Get a reliable compass from a name brand like Silva.  Make sure it has  a straight edge.  Know how to use your compass or it is useless weight.
  3. Flashlight – Headlamps are great, but small bright flashlights are sufficient. Make sure you have fresh batteries in your light before you leave and pack enough extra batteries to last your trip.  Many people carry an extra bulb as well.
  4. Knife – Pocket knife, sharpened to your liking.  Multi-tools are great, as are knives with two good blades.
  5. Lighter / Matches – Wooden, strike anywhere matches, waterproofed in a good waterproof container are great.  Lighters can fail if not kept dry.
  6. Fire Starter – Two 3 to 5 inch hard wax candles work well.  In the Inland Northwest we have the great fortune of having birch bark which works great.
  7. Extra Clothing – Bring an extra set of clothing suited to the worst possible conditions you could possibly encounter for the area and time you are visiting.  Including a beanie is a great idea!
  8. Extra Food – High energy foods, such as Power Bars or even a Snicker bar are great.
  9. Water – One liter minimum, and way to treat water is a great idea.
  10. First Aid Kit – There are many good first aid kits available commercially, or you could build one yourself.  Always consider carrying it in a waterproof container.
  11. Sun Protection (sunblock / sunglasses) – Dark lenses with 100% UVA and UVB protection, or nearly so. Zinc oxide or sun block with SPF 15 or higher is preferred.  Waterproof or “sweat proof” sun block recommended.  Don’t forget a sunhat and long sleeve shirts in sunny climates and/or summer seasons.
  12. Emergency Shelter – A small plastic tarp or two large plastic contractor bags will keep the wind and rain off ofyou.
  13. Signal Devices – Many hikers carry a whistle and a mirror.  Discarded CD disks can even make an adequate signaling mirror.  When in survival situation getting found often relies on using other methods beside your voice.

When your lost do the right thing – STOP.

You’re lost, now what?  STOP.

S – top – When you’re lost there is nothing worst that continuing down a route that you “think” may pan out.  It most situations (non-threatening) staying in one location can be best so rescuers can locate you sooner.

T – hink – When you’re in your “reptile brain” it’s pretty easy to go to “fight or flight”.  It’s important to not flip your lid, and stay in your pre-frontal cortex, so you can rationally and logically consider your options at present, and what will be needed to thrive down the road.

O – bserve – Once you are grounded, consider your options.  Do you have enough available resources around you to sustain you and your party, and what can be used?  Are there any actual threats to life or limb which require your immediate attention? What is the best method to signal for rescue?

P – lan – Once you have weighed your options make the most sound plan possible.  Consider all the perceived and actual risks that could result in decisions presented.  When time is available provide ample opportunity to shoot holes in your plan, and re-work to come up with the best plan possible solution that will allow you to thrive until the Calvary arrives.

Backcountry “know-how” goes beyond just having the right gear. You should know how to use it, when, coupled with the right leadership skills. Photo Credit: Seth Quigg

SOLE teaches outdoor living and travel skills such as the ones mentioned here during much of its day-based and expedition-based backcountry programs – in addition we offer stand-alone outdoor skill workshops. For more information on SOLE’s programs and/or to register for an upcoming SOLE Experience go to www.soleexperiences.org or contact us at info@soleexperiences.org or 928.351.SOLE.

See you out there,DennisonTeaching
Dennison Webb, M.A.
Founder | Executive Director

 

Why is outdoor free play important for your child?

Since inception SOLE has facilitated programs which highlights outdoor free play for youth. From exploring a wetland with peers during our Stewardship Experience program, or just getting ‘down and dirty’  building a fort in our Junior Naturalist Experience summer programs, youth are constantly immersed in natural learning environments where they are able to freely explore their local wildlands while also learning about the natural systems which exist.  

When at SOLE outdoor free play provides the ideal ‘habitat’ to develop the whole child.

Even with our intentionally-designed curricula as the framework, youth are consistently provided unstructured outdoor play, or as it is commonly known free play, during most SOLE Experiences SM which starts in our programs for youth 4 years of age.  While our organization is an obvious proponent for purposeful experiential and outdoor education curricula, we also actively support personal and group exploration outdoors.  At SOLE, free play can be considered as moments where youth naturally engage with themselves and their peers without direct facilitation.  It is in these moments when youth really heighten their emotional, social, physical and mental well being.

Getting ‘down & dirty’ during a Junior Naturalist Experience at SOLE!

Free play is capable of developing the executive control center of our brains at an early age.  In fact, it’s been shown to have a negative impact on children’s brain development when they are removed from this critical learning environment.  As we dig into it bit further, we can naturally see how developing higher order skills like critical-thinking and problem solving can occur without direct facilitation from simple endeavors like building a fort with a friend. It’s not to say that a deeper level of comprehension of lesson objectives cannot be attained through effective facilitation – it can. However, there is still much to be said for those opportunities where individuals take ownership of their learning process and freely explore the moments, especially those in nature. And the benefits do not stop there.1

When exploring what’s ‘out there’ we engage our physical self into wild landscapes.

Free play promotes physical well-being. Current research shows the decline in outdoor and physical activity for youth, including free play opportunities. There is also a growing body of evidence, which shows the correlation between the decrease in physical outdoor activity and childhood obesity. Also, there are current studies that show that children are most physically active when provided these very opportunities.2

Another benefit is supporting positive attention. In fact, when children are provided the opportunity to immerse themselves in outdoor free play, they are often more attentive and respectful when re-entering a more structured indoor learning setting.

Also, free play provides the opportunity for actual social engagement and character development. Establishing and maintaining friendships is a tremendous outcome of free play. By providing an opportunity for children to freely engage their peers is naturally how we learn to relate – an essential life skill.  Children are also learning from their failures, and mistakes allowing them to develop the 7 C’s of Resilience a cornerstone of most SOLE programs.  These essential life skills have also been directly linked to future positive outcomes, including academic achievement. 3

It’s kind of hard to NOT have a good time, when you’re getting ‘down and dirty’ with your friends!

Lastly, is the shift in affect, which is achieved through free play. Children who experience free play are naturally happy.  And isn’t that how children should be?  They are doing what they want, how they want.  Hey, don’t get me wrong I am NOT saying that we should hold boundaries and set-limits with youth, however, there is often space for them to explore that which is inherently valuable – their own thoughts, feelings, and actions.

Whether it’s genuine happiness or cognitive development, the importance of outdoor free play is undeniable.   SOLE will continue to provide opportunities for children to engage in this manner. With an increase in actual “screen time,” the importance of providing these opportunities is paramount. If not now, when?  And what will the outcome be if we do not provide these opportunities?

Youth can engage in this manner in summer and school programs, including those listed below.  All summer programs are currently open for registration and enrolling strong.

For more information and/or to register for upcoming SOLE Experiences simply click on one of the programs hyperlinked above or go to our registration page to select your program to begin your adventurous exploration!  As always, feel free to contact us if you have any other questions or needs!

june

10jun(jun 10)9:00 am14(jun 14)5:00 pmLEAD Experience | Closed ProgramLeader of the Day (LOD) Experience | Idaho Vocational Rehabilitation (15-18 y/o)9:00 am - 5:00 pm (14) Chewelah Peak Learning Center

17jun(jun 17)9:00 am19(jun 19)3:00 pmFeaturedFieldwork Experience | OpenJunior Naturalist Experience | Nature Detective: Session I (4-6 y/o)9:00 am - 3:00 pm (19) Round Lake State Park

july

15jul(jul 15)9:00 am17(jul 17)3:00 pmFeaturedFieldwork Experience | OpenJunior Naturalist Experience | Nature Detective: Session II (4-6 y/o)9:00 am - 3:00 pm (17) Round Lake State Park

15jul(jul 15)9:00 am19(jul 19)5:00 pmLEAD Experience | OPEN ProgramLeader of the Day (LOD) Experience | OPEN9:00 am - 5:00 pm (19) Idaho | Montana

22jul(jul 22)9:00 am27(jul 27)5:00 pmFeaturedLEAD Experience | Open ProgramTeen Trek Experience | Exploratory Trek | Male-Specific (13-17 y/o)9:00 am - 5:00 pm (27) PST Cabinet Mountains, Montana

august

05aug(aug 5)9:00 am10(aug 10)5:00 pmFeaturedLEAD Experience | Open ProgramTeen Trek Experience | Empowermnt Trek | Female-Specific (13-17 y/o)9:00 am - 5:00 pm (10) PST Cabinet Mountains, Montana

12aug(aug 12)9:00 am14(aug 14)3:00 pmFeaturedFieldwork Experience | OpenJunior Naturalist Experience | Nature Detective: Session III (4-6 y/o)9:00 am - 3:00 pm (14) Round Lake State Park

september

No Events

october

No Events

november

29nov6:00 pm10:00 pmFeatured14th Annual Backcountry Film Festival6:00 pm - 10:00 pm Panida Theater

See you out there,DennisonTeaching
Dennison Webb, M.A.
Founder | Executive Director

1 http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2014/08/06/336361277/scientists-say-childs-play-helps-build-a-better-brain

http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/485902

https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/02/15/how-free-play-can-define-kids-success/

Why enroll your child in a summer program with SOLE!

A recent study showed that youth are now spending (9) non-school related hours per day, that’s (63) hours per week connected to a media device1! Add school projects and homework and we are developing a concerning phenomena.   ReWild your child in SOLE’s Junior Naturalist Experience program, or let your teen go on an outdoor adventure of a lifetime in SOLE’s Teen Trek Experience program this summer!  Why? Well let’s take a closer look.

Thanks to brain mapping, we now have evidence that youth and adolescent brains are actually quite sensitive and malleable to external stimuli.  In fact, the adolescent brain has the opportunity to establish essential memory pathways during those years of development, like those related to what are considered executive functions (e.g., higher order processing skills).

Photo credit: Ucla.edu3

During this time, the brain also has the ability to get rid of unnecessary neurons through a process known as neural pruning, which is actually quite similar to getting rid of unproductive limbs on a fruit tee.  As neuroscientist Donald Hebb said, “Neurons that fire together wire together.”2  So, in short, if you don’t use it, you loose it. Because youth are spending an extraordinary amount of time “wired in” to media sources (like social media) they are essentially hard-wiring their brain to function in this fashion, and as a result, expect to receive and process information accordingly.  So you might so so what’s the big deal?

Well, simply put the ‘virtual’ cognitive processes aren’t always applicable in ‘real world’ contexts.  For example, navigating real world problems often requires intellectual flexibility, patience, resilience, and emotional regulation.  When our brains are rewarded in a simple and quick fashion ala ‘how many likes we have’ it presents a false sense of reality – that our end goal is quick and succinct.  This is obviously far from the norm.  Additionally, consider the social deficits that we reinforce as someone continually ‘looks down’ to communicate and relate.  Research is now showing increases in social anxiety, poor communication skills, emotional dysregulation, inattentiveness, and other mental, physical and behavioral health issues all due to being ‘disconnected’ through technology3.  Let’s shift to a cause and effect relationship.

If an animal is constantly fed by humans it becomes habituated – relying on those food sources to sustain their existence.  When released into the wild, they can’t function because they have been conditioned to live a certain way.   The human brain is not much different.  When utilizing technology in an unhealthy fashion, our brain becomes habituated – a creature of habit – expecting to give and receive information a certain way.

Pediatricians, neuroscientists, and youth development experts agree that our youth require diverse and intentional experiences ‘unplugged’ to help them grow into healthy adults.  SOLE’s transformational experiential education programs provides the essential ingredients to explore, achieve, and lead throughout the year.

Let’s take a look at the top 10 Reasons to immerse your child in a natural learning environment with SOLE this summer:

  1. Unplug to reconnect!  Providing an opportunity for your child to take a break from the TV, their smart phone, iPad, and social media accounts allows them to rediscover their creative powers through their natural senses.  This allows them to connect to the real world, with real people, through real activities, and therefore, forge real thoughts and emotions, as well as develop real relationships with others and their environment.
  2. Reconnect with our natural world!  Nature Deficit Disorder is a real condition, which has real consequences.  Summer outdoor experience provides the ideal setting to address nature deficit, and therefore, support  healthy child development.
  3. Develop executive functions!  Can you imagine going on a road trip without a map? Executive functions provide the essential ingredients to plan, organize, problem-solve, and cope when faced with challenges along the way.  SOLE’s summer programs provide the ideal setting for youth to develop these and other executive controls.
  4. Get physically active! As shown in the intro above, youth spend a significant amount of time today just sitting inside, sedentary, and wired-in.  Doing so has a negative impact on personal well-being.  After all, humans were not designed to be sedentary beings.  Through SOLE’s summer programs, and accompanying experiential curricula youth are provided the ideal setting to be physical activity through continuous experiential games and/or activities from start to finish in a fun and engaging fashion allowing the ideal setting to address this deficiency in a novel manner.
  5. Competence yields confidence! SOLE intentionally designs experiential/outdoor education curricula that allows program participants to develop and master outdoor and academic skills while simultaneously building self-confidence and self-esteem through active coaching and a peer-based culture grounded on a safe and positive learning environment.  This provides the ideal setting to take a risk, learn from your failures, and master skills.
  6. Become flexible and resilient! The reality in the ‘real world’ is that it doesn’t always go as we expect it to.  Being successful in life requires that we execute flexibility to adapt to the various stressors that life presents us.  Additionally, it is important that youth develop resilience.  Life chews us up and spits us out sometimes.  The more resilience that we are able to develop in our younger years, the better we are able to endure challenging setbacks.  SOLE’s summer programs provide a healthy dose of challenges that require youth develop these essential skills.
  7. Free time & unstructured play! Picture this.  You hike all day and arrive at a beautiful alpine lake, surrounding by mountains.  Untouched beauty.  In addition, to the other benefits of SOLE’s summer program offerings.  Our programs provide a natural setting to relax, laugh, and make long lasting friendships.  Free time & unstructured play also provide the opportunity for youth to tap into their creative and problem-solving skills which is why we intentionally place this time into our our summer programs, including our Junior Naturalist Experience programs.
  8. Develop meaningful relationships! SOLE’s summer programs provide the ideal setting to develop meaningful relationships with newly found friends, your surrounding natural world, even with yourself.  Our programs provide real world shared experiences without distraction fostering the opportunity to develop sincere and meaningful connections.
  9. Develop essential life skills!  During our programs we often share with our participants — it’s what happens AFTER the SOLE Experience that counts.  In other words, the skills that are mastered and the lessons learned are applicable well-beyond ‘out there’ and can be transferred and generalized into a ‘real world’ setting.  To do so,
  10. Grow independence! – SOLE’s summer programs provide the ideal setting for youth to make their own decisions without parents and teachers in the mix.  Making choices where there is a direct cause and effect relationship can foster independence and related benefits.  SOLE Field Instructors facilitate experiential programs that provide these and other ‘teachable moments’ for program participants.

Oh yeah, it’s good ‘ole fashion fun!

SOLE’s summer programs are uniquely positioned to foster healthy youth development.  SOLE’s summer programs are also the perfect partner for schools, families, youth groups, organizations, agencies, or community centers provide holistic education that yields an increase in personal self confidence and independence, problem-solving and decision-making skills, social and emotional skills, personal and character development – all in positive learning environment under the supervision of positive adult role models with formal experience and education.

So we hope your family will join us this summer as we venture out there!

 

Ready to get started?  Click on one of the SOLE Experiences SM below!

june

10jun(jun 10)9:00 am14(jun 14)5:00 pmLEAD Experience | Closed ProgramLeader of the Day (LOD) Experience | Idaho Vocational Rehabilitation (15-18 y/o)9:00 am - 5:00 pm (14) Chewelah Peak Learning Center

17jun(jun 17)9:00 am19(jun 19)3:00 pmFeaturedFieldwork Experience | OpenJunior Naturalist Experience | Nature Detective: Session I (4-6 y/o)9:00 am - 3:00 pm (19) Round Lake State Park

july

15jul(jul 15)9:00 am17(jul 17)3:00 pmFeaturedFieldwork Experience | OpenJunior Naturalist Experience | Nature Detective: Session II (4-6 y/o)9:00 am - 3:00 pm (17) Round Lake State Park

15jul(jul 15)9:00 am19(jul 19)5:00 pmLEAD Experience | OPEN ProgramLeader of the Day (LOD) Experience | OPEN9:00 am - 5:00 pm (19) Idaho | Montana

22jul(jul 22)9:00 am27(jul 27)5:00 pmFeaturedLEAD Experience | Open ProgramTeen Trek Experience | Exploratory Trek | Male-Specific (13-17 y/o)9:00 am - 5:00 pm (27) PST Cabinet Mountains, Montana

august

05aug(aug 5)9:00 am10(aug 10)5:00 pmFeaturedLEAD Experience | Open ProgramTeen Trek Experience | Empowermnt Trek | Female-Specific (13-17 y/o)9:00 am - 5:00 pm (10) PST Cabinet Mountains, Montana

12aug(aug 12)9:00 am14(aug 14)3:00 pmFeaturedFieldwork Experience | OpenJunior Naturalist Experience | Nature Detective: Session III (4-6 y/o)9:00 am - 3:00 pm (14) Round Lake State Park

september

No Events

october

No Events

november

29nov6:00 pm10:00 pmFeatured14th Annual Backcountry Film Festival6:00 pm - 10:00 pm Panida Theater

Dennison Webb, MA
Founder | Executive Director

 

 

Kersting, T. Disconnected: How to reconnect our digitally distracted kids.

https://ottawamindfulnessclinic.com/2010/05/06/neural-pruning/

http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/the-teenage-brain-on-social-media

Be Bear Aware

As spring, summer, and fall arrives, it is a beautiful time to explore our local wildlands and is feasting time for all creatures – great and small – including our local bears.  As such, it’s imperative that we take Bear Aware principles with us into as we journey into the backcountry to bike, hike, paddle, camp, hunt or fish.

In the fall of 2016 several grizzly attacks occurred in Montana (see video here – caution graphic material).  This encounter happened on the heels of two other additional grizzly attacks of hunters in the same state.  What was once a rarity (to see a grizzly in the wild, western backcountry) is becoming more prevalent due to the success in the conservation of the species, and the loss of habitat that it calls home.   In addition, black bears can also be troublesome and often more unpredictable and can lead to unwanted encounters.  Whatever the species, it is imperative that when we venture into the wild, we must remain vigilant and be bear aware.  

Each season poses its own potential risk. When spring emerges hibertating bears awake from their slumber on the search for one thing on mind – food. Because bears are frankly hungry, travelers should use caution when traveling into bear country. Consider the following considerations when hiking or camping in bear country, and if you do so you will be equipped and ready with a solid wildland ethic. Like spring, fall bears are quite active – storing reserves for their upcoming hibernation.  Folks often aren’t sure how to minimize their contact with a bear when exploring our wild landscapes.  So, to assist with this, we will share some Leave No Trace Outdoor Skills and Ethics  that we utilize (and teach) in the field, which are supported by our partners at The Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics.  We hope this information will help you minimize and mitigate this risk, and allow you to enjoy the remaining days of fall in the backcountry.  So let’s get started!

 Plan Ahead and Prepare:

As the first, of 7 Leave No Trace (LNT) Principles, Plan Ahead and Prepare often serves as the foundation.  It is a really good idea to spend some time and review the specific wildlife regulations for the area that you will be visiting, and even calling the land management agency of where you will be visiting.  Some questions to consider when doing so:

  • Do you require bear canisters and/or require that you store your food and other “smellables” in a particular manner?
  • Has there been any recent bear activity in the area that you will be visiting?

The old adage, a fed bear, is a dead bear” is true.  When we travel in the backcountry it is essential to minimize bears encounters and their contact with human food.  Once bears have been introduced with human food they will continually seek it out as an easier food source, leading to continued encounters.  This is called habituation. On most occasions, this leads to a bear being “taken down” (e.g., killed).  This also includes selecting appropriate campsites, disposing of waste properly, considering appropriate food / smellable storage, and overall respecting wildlife.

Choosing an Appropriate Campsite:

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A good consideration is to local open space areas to camp versus those that are densely vegetated to allow for more awareness for both you and the bear of each other’s presence.  In addition, you may consider the “bear”muda triangle (see image to the right), which positions your cooking, shelter, and food storage area 100 yards from each other.

Dispose of Waste Properly & Appropriate Food / Smellable Storage:

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Another important LNT Principle is Dispose of Waste Properly.  This can affect whether or not we lure in one of our furry friends, and can be counterproductive.  For example, while broadcasting grey-water may be a common practice when considering this principle, it can also spread the odor when doing so on land.  Not ideal in grizzly country.  Therefore, other considerations can include digging a sump (6-8″ deep) to dispose of grey-water from cooking, cleaning and brushing teeth. Read more from our partners at Leave No Trace here.

When considering storing food and “smellable” items (i.e., sunscreen, toothpaste, deodorant, lotions, chapstick, etc.) some land management agencies in bear country allow backcountry users to utilize bear hangs (see image left) in lieu of bear canisters.

If you do decide to go old school, and “hang a bear bag”, there are definitely some considerations to take.  You’ll need to consider an appropriate set-up, including specific location, appropriate distance (e.g., minimum of 5′ x 5′ x 12′), durable “bear bags”, rope, and some know how.  Review some additional tips from The Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics here and check out the image above to help get you started.  In addition, if you choose the bear hang method, make sure that the area that you are visiting actually has trees!  Alpine areas like those with tundra where bears can frequent do not, so you’ll need to make adjustments to your bear storage considerations.

If the terrain you will be traveling in is not advantageous to a bear hang and/or the land management agency does not allow bear hangs in their food storage allowances, you will have to either purchase or rent a bear canister.  There are several great models, and if you don’t want to purchase one and won’t use it frequently you can actually rent them for a nominal fee from a land management agency or gear shop.  After all, they are kind of spendy!  If you decide to go this route and are venturing into the our neck of the woods, in the Selkirks, Purcells, or Cabinets feel free to contact us to rent one directly from us!

Respect Wildlife:

As one of the 7 principles of Leave No Trace, and an awareness of what exists out there, one might think it should go without saying – Respect Wildlife.  Still it’s worth noting.  Here are some tips to assist you in doing just that.

  1. When traveling in bear country make noise!  Yelling, “Hey Bear!” is the go-to, but should be done on average of once every 5 – 10 seconds.  Some people recommend every 30, however, you can carry a lot of ground in 30 seconds and your voice doesn’t carry too far in dense vegetation or near a noisy mountain creek.  In addition, when entering dense vegetation, around blind corners, and near loud creeks we recommend to also add some clapping to really let you presence be known.  One of the main contributing factors to unwanted bear encounters is alarming a bear, and catching them off guard.  Not a great scenario, especially when it’s a healthy sow with cubs.  While we all love to have those pristine, peaceful moments in the wild, it’s important that when traveling in bear country to also minimize encounters for their sake and yours.
  2. Travel in groups of 4 or more.  It has statistically been shown that hiking in groups of four or more is safer while traveling in griz country, however one could argue that it may be a wise practice in any type of bear country.
  3. View at a distance.  Bears can cover a large distance in a short amount of time.  While they are amazing to view in the wild, putting real estate between you and a big ‘ole bruin is a good thing, so use binoculars at a distance.  To give you some perspective, according to the Fish and Wildlife Service a grizzly can cover 50 yards in 3 seconds, or 40 miles and hour.  That’s faster than a racehorse over short distances!  Learn more bear encounter facts from the Fish and Wildlife Service  here.
  4. Effective use of bear spray to deter an encounter!  Bear spray has proven itself to be quite effective, and often the last resort.  However, it is only as effective as the actual user.  We recommend that you research what type of bear spray to purchase, and educate yourself on how to use it.  Here is a great little introductory video from Rich Landers of the Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA) on how to use bear spray effectively, and here is a great powerpoint from the United States Geological Survey on bear spray.  Also here is an excellent blog entry written by Todd Wilkinson that shares evidence-based research on bear encounters and the use of bear spray.

Blog support from our partners at The Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics: http://www.lnt.org

For more information and to become more backcountry savvy, consider taking one of SOLE’s Leave No Trace Courses, or design your own!  These courses allow participants to learn and master these skills in the environment that they will be traveling in.

See you out there,
Dennison Webb, M.A.
Founder | Executive Director

SOLE receives generous support for our SnowSchool Experience program!

Since it’s inception in 2014, SOLE’s SnowSchool Experience SM program has become a cornerstone of our organization’s experiential education program offerings serving over 800 youth over the past (3) years.  While SOLE strives to custom-tailor all SOLE Experiences SM for individual participants, schools, and other stakeholders we serve, this program primarily serves 5th – 12th grade local area public and private schools.  Each season program participants are able to experience a rich interdisciplinary curricula which includes lessons related to  SOLE’s 4 Cares SM, snow science, winter ecology, avalanche awareness, and winter outdoor living and travel skills.  SOLE aligns SnowSchool Experience SM curriculum to state standards, Next Generation Science Standards, and Common Core to ensure that goals, objectives, and learning targets are met.  Coupled with novel organizational philosophies, evidence-based best practices, and pedagogies related to experiential education to include outdoor education, place-based education, and project-based learning – students come to SOLE each winter to be immersed in a natural learning learning environment where they can truly explore, achieve, and lead!

A noteworthy and consistent goal of our organization is to provide affordable access to the transformational experiential education programs we offer, including our SnowSchool Experiences SM.  As such, SOLE staff and board works diligently constructing grants, soliciting sponsorship, and fundraising during our Annual Backcountry Film Festival events held each fall.  And the hard work is continuing to pay off.  Over the past few months we have had the great fortune to receive two grant awards from local foundations to support our SnowSchool Experience SM program, allowing us to ‘reach and teach’ into 2017!

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Earlier this summer, SOLE received notice that we would be awarded a $7,000 grant award from the Panhandle Alliance for Education (PAFE) to support our 5th grade SnowSchool Experience program with Lake Pend Oreille School District.  This noteworthy support will provide access to a (3) day experience for over 300 5th students in Lake Pend Oreille School District.  Students experience a pre-lesson in the classroom where they are oriented to what to expect “in the field”, introductory experiential lessons related to watershed geology, hydrology, and geography; mountain snowpack as it relates to a community natural resource including an orientation to the ever important concept known as Snow Water Equivalency (SWE).  Once in the field students deepen their learning comprehension as they experientially learn the finer points of snowshoeing, winter ecology, and snow science.  This full day portion of the program includes experiential lessons on introductory outdoor living and travel skills, winter ecology, and snow science.  The later includes the completion of a thorough snowpit profile where students collect data and assess the snowpack to include, hardness, snow crystallography, temperature, and SWE.  Once back in the classroom students synthesize the data they collected and compare and contrast their findings to local historical SWE trends to draw conclusions related to their communities’ water resource needs.  This includes completion of a line graph detailing their findings.  As one might imagine, this program provides a novel gateway to address academic standards related to math, science, and other core subject, as well as those related to physical education, leadership, and character development.

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More recently, SOLE was also awarded a $10,000 grant from the Inland Northwest Community Foundation, Equinox Foundation Grant Program for our SnowSchool Experience SM program expansion. This support will continue our work within Bonner County schools to include providing custom-tailored SnowSchool Experiences SM for schools like Clark Fork Junior / Senior High School, as well as expand offerings into the Boundary County School District.  Areas of focus will include those aspects previously mentioned, as well as providing opportunities to teach snow science related to avalanche awareness, and outdoor living and travel skills for the youth of Bonner and Boundary County.

We are truly grateful for the continued support that these three organizations have shown towards our SnowSchool Experience SM program, and SOLE at large.  Because of this support, will be able to further our mission and students will be afforded access to the transformational experiential education programming that our SnowSchool Experience SM program offers.  Additionally, we are also grateful for the continued support that Schweitzer Mountain Resort, the Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center , and the Winter Wildlands Alliance has shown to underpin our work in the field.

Still the work continues, as the grants awarded will only partially support our SnowSchool Experience SM program as it is currently established.  In addition, we have a greater vision which includes the establishment of yurts at our SnowSchool Experience SM Field Campuses, including Schweitzer Mountain Resort so our programs have access to a classroom space in times of severe inclement weather, and so these programming opportunities are available for future local area youth in our region.  You can do you part by attending and participating in our Annual Backcountry Film Festival, becoming a program or event sponsor, or by making a tax deductible in-kind or financial contribution by clicking here or simply contact us.

For those seeking further evidence of the benefits please take time to look at our SnowSchool Experience SM videos, and review some of the numbers, comments, and student story below:

Elementary SnowSchool Experience SM program video:

Middle & HighSchool SnowSchool Experience SM program video:

Some relevant numbers:

  • Between 60-97% of the students that attend our local public schools qualify for a free-reduced lunch (at or below the poverty level).
  • Over 80% of the students rated their SnowSchool Experience as 4 or 5 (on a 1-5 Likert-type Scale)
  • Over 70% of students acknowledged snowshoeing and exploring their local mountain ecosystem for the first time.
  • Over 80% of students demonstrated a greater understanding of the importance of mountain snowpack as it relates to our communities water resource needs.

Some of the many positive comments.

  • “I really liked learning about different trees.”
  • “Best trip Ever!”
  • “I hope that they will never stop SnowSchool! Fun and education!!”
  • “I learned so many new things at SnowSchool,such as: snow-shoeing.”
  • “I had fun because I got to do science I might not get to do anymore unless I become a hydrologist.”
  • “I would like to share that I would go again if I had a chance.”
  • “The most awesome field trip I have ever gone on!” 

A student’s story:

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Personally, when I reflect on our organization’s accomplishments with this program and view the view the pieces above I recognize the significant benefits that this transformational experiential education program offers our local area youth including the ability to make sound academic connections in a novel manner, as well as the opportunity to be immersed in a natural learning environment to further develop a relationship within themselves, with their peers, with their environment, and with their community.

See you out there,DennisonTeaching
Dennison Webb, M.A.
Founder | Executive Director

5 ways how a summer SOLE Experience can strengthen your child.

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From backpacking adventures into the wilds to walks into an urban park, summer provides the opportune time to unplug and reconnect to the great outdoors.  With an uptick in standardized testing, homework, or other school / after-school responsibilities during the regular school year there is little time for most families to venture out to the great unknown, and many simple do not for one reason or another.  Despite these real barriers a growing body of evidence is showing us why immersion in the outdoors is critical for our own well-being, as well as, our community and its environment.  So what can you do about it?  At SOLE, we recommend that parents strongly consider extra-curricular programming that specifically targets this need, especially when school isn’t ‘in session’.

5 ways your child can benefit from a SOLE Experience SM this summer!

  1. Nurturing their brain through nature.  Let’s face it, there is no better way to decompress than being in a beautiful natural setting.   SOLE uses extended summer expeditions to promote such opportunities for youth and young adults.  This way of life can be rather simplistic fostering an environment that lacks the stress that weighs on our 3 pound computer in the semi-quasi real world.  The end result?  Rest and restoration.  National Geographic. ‘This is Your Brain on Nature’ (January 2016) gives props to this very cause and effect relationship, coupled with the term, coined by a cognitive psychologist David Strayer, known as the  “three day effect”. In short, Mr. Strayer spent a great deal of time researching the restorative effects of nature-based immersion on one of our most important resources – our brain.
  2. Creating healthy behaviors and patterns.  Remember the days of building forts, exploring and learning about our natural world, chasing each other and playing games like ‘capture the flag’?  SOLE’s summer programs, such as our Junior Naturalist Experiences SM captures the innocence of our youth, and for good reason.  With an increase in screen time (on average 7.5 hours per day connected to some sort of media device) our youth are more removed from outdoor play.  Let’s face it, technology is a blessing and a curse. Technological advances have continued to move us towards great advancements and development.  However, they have also fostered us to move away from naturally developing critical-thinking and problem-solving, and other life skills.   In addition, why do the heavy lifting when a machine can do it?  Simply put, consistent access to ‘screen time’ has led to a more sedentary life-style.  Interestingly, we have seen a surge in childhood obesity since technological advancements in personal computing and social media have come on scene.  Causation or coincidence, you decide – one thing is for certain when you unplug and reconnect to the outdoors there are less distractions and ample opportunity to develop oneself in a healthy manner.
  3. Comprehension of abstract concepts.  Experiential education provides the ideal modality to present, learn and master skills.  Why?  An intentionally designed and facilitated experiential education program, like SOLE’s SOLE Experiences SM, allows participants, to directly experience and learn via a hand-on, boots-on-the-ground approach which taps into different learning styles and individualized needs.  From a neurological perspective, an experiential learning setting fosters the ideal environment to spark the brain and create memory pathways that sustains learning comprehension well beyond the actual experience promoting the opportunity for generalization to occur.  This sort of positive growth and development supports future academic achievement.
  4. Developing a sense of belonging and affinity for nature.  With the hustle and bustle of this crazy thing called “life” it seems we rarely have time to pause and take stock of what we are actually experiencing.  Because the world around us can be a ‘blur’ and at an arms length, we may struggle to truly appreciate that which is around us.   Summer SOLE Experiences SM allow us to do just that – slow down and take it all in, thus allowing us to develop meaningful relationships with those we are with and our surrounding environment.  Experiences such as these forge memories that last a lifetime, and that can set a trajectory for positive choices for our community and its environment.
  5. Experiencing transformation that transfers.  There is something truly special about Summer SOLE Experiences SM.  Participants leave with greater self-confidence and willingness to take a risk, more awareness of the natural systems which exist in the natural world, lasting positive memories and relationships, and the list goes on.  Thanks in part to our savvy Field Instructors and intentional program design, our participants are able to experience something which actually shifts their paradigm in a positive direction.  This transformation is not accidental.  For example, learning cool outdoor technical skills like land navigation (e.g., map and compass) on a Teen Trek Experience SM  can serve as a metaphor and spring board for future leadership development opportunities whether on trail or the sidewalk.

We hope that your summer is a memorable one, full of adventure and exploration in the great outdoors!

See you out there,DennisonTeaching
Dennison Webb, M.A.
Founder | Executive Director

2015 Summer Programming Update!

campfireWe don’t normally send out seasonal programming updates, however, our summer 2015 season has been met with a tremendous drought sparking wildfires across our local and regional course areas. While SOLE continues to work diligently to run all courses on schedule in specific locales, modifications and even cancellations have been made to mitigate this backcountry risk.  We have made these hard decisions based on the hard evidence which exists ‘out there’, which were recently supported by recommendations presented by local United States Forest Service (USFS) districts.  These decisions will ensure that our clientele’s safety needs continue to be paramount, as well as, support local and regional land management agencies which active fire suppression efforts.   If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact us.

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More specifically, as shown in the image above we have several wildfires in our course area(s) including the 6,147 acre Parker Ridge fire (in the Selkirk Mountains due North of Sandpoint, Idaho) and the Clark Fork Complex which includes the 2,143 acre Scotchman Peak fire (in the Cabinet Mountains due East of Sandpoint, Idaho), and the 576 acre Whitetail Peak fire. Also, we have numerous “hotspots” which are being currently tracked.  Many of these wildfires were sparked by lightning as summer thunderstorms rubbled through over the last few weeks and months.  For the most up to date information on local wildfires, including evacuations, road closures, and community meetings go to InciWeb.

The SOLE family extends our sincere gratitude to those on the front lines and those affected.  

There is no doubt about it our current fire danger is extreme, so if you are planning to venture into the backcountry please exercise caution.  Also, please contact you local Forest Service or other land management agency to get the most up to date information prior to heading out. These agencies can give you all pertinent information including current and active wildfires, and specific closures.  

Lastly, when recreating please minimize your impact by using outdoor skills and ethics supported by SOLE and our partners at the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Skills and Ethics.  If you are interested in learning more please consider signing up for a Leave No Trace course.  SOLE is currently offering a course on September 25th for National Public Lands Day.   All proceeds collected will go to support SOLE’s Youth Scholarship Fund.  Go to the SOLE Calendar to view a complete listing of all upcoming course offerings.

Stay safe and happy trails,DennisonTeaching
Dennison Webb, M.A.
Founder | Executive Director

Don’t Spark That Wildfire!


Caveman-CampfireThere’s something about that ubiquitous campfire.  It just draws us in, and there is nothing like sharing tall tales, kinship and laughter around a campfire.  That said, campfires also have their drawbacks, especially when they are misused.  In fact, campfires can scar and sterilize the ground, and their remnants can be left behind for thousands of years.  Not to mention – wildfires.  The reality – as many as 90 percent of wildfires are caused by humans.

This summer is of special importance as we enter a significant drought for much of the Pacific Northwest and other parts of the country.  In fact, our fire season is definitely going to be one worth noting as the current conditions are showing us (see the USGS figure below to see how dry it is).  So what can we do about it?  Simple.  Follow Leave No Trace Principle #5 from our partners at the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics.

11167851_823146357782356_1712455768355791733_nPrinciple 5: Minimize Campfire Impacts

Fires vs. Stoves: The use of campfires, once a necessity for cooking and warmth, is steeped in history and tradition. Some people would not think of camping without a campfire. Campfire building is also an important skill for every camper. Yet, the natural appearance of many areas has been degraded by the overuse of fires and an increasing demand for firewood. The development of light weight efficient camp stoves has encouraged a shift away from the traditional fire. Stoves have be come essential equipment for minimum-impact camping. They are fast, flexible, and eliminate firewood availability as a concern in campsite selection. Stoves operate in almost any weather condition, and they Leave No Trace.

Should I build a fire?

  • The most important consideration to be made when deciding to use a fire is the potential damage to the backcountry.
  • What is the fire danger for the time of year and the location you have selected? n Are there administrative restrictions from the agency that administers the area?
  • Is there sufficient wood so its removal will not be noticeable?
  • Does the harshness of alpine and desert growing conditions for trees and shrubs mean that the regeneration of wood sources cannot keep pace with the demand for firewood?
  • Do group members possess the skill to build a campfire that will Leave No Trace?

Lessing the impact when campfires are used.

Camp in areas where wood is abundant if building a fire. Choose not to have a fire in areas where there is little wood at higher elevations, in heavily used areas, or in desert settings. A true Leave No Trace fire shows no evidence of having been constructed.

What about existing fire rings?

The best place to build a fire is within an existing fire ring in a well-placed campsite. Keep the fire small and burning only for the time you are using it. Allow wood to burn completely to ash. Put out fires with water, not dirt. Dirt may not completely extinguish the fire. Avoid building fires next to rock out crops where the black scars will remain for many years.

What exactly is a mound fire?

Construction of a mound fire can be accomplished by using simple tools: a garden trowel, large stuff sack and a ground cloth or plastic garbage bag.

Follow the simple steps below:

  1. Collect some mineral soil, sand, or gravel from an already disturbed source. The root hole of a toppled tree is one such source.
  2. Lay a ground cloth on the fire site and then spread the soil into a circular, flat-topped mound at least 3 to 5 inches thick. The thickness of the mound is critical to insulate the ground below from the heat of the fire. The ground cloth or garbage bag is important only in that it makes cleaning up the fire much easier. The circumference of the mound should be larger than the size of the fire to allow for the spreading of coals. The advantage of the mound fire is that it can be built on flat exposed rock or on an organic surface such as litter, duff or grass.

What about a fire pan?
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Use of a fire pan is a good alternative for fire building. Metal oil drain pans and some backyard barbecue grills make effective and inexpensive fire pans. The pan should have at least three-inch-high sides. It should be elevated on rocks or lined with mineral soil so the heat does not scorch the ground.

What about firewood and clean-up?

Standing trees, dead or alive, are home to birds and insects, so leave them intact. Fallen trees also provide bird and animal shelter, increase water holding capacity of the soil, and recycle nutrients back into the environment through decomposition. Stripping branches from standing or fallen trees also detracts from an area’s natural appearance.

  • Avoid using hatchets, saws, or breaking branches off standing or downed trees. Dead and down wood burns easily, is easy to collect and leaves less impact.
  • Use small pieces of wood no larger than the diameter of an adult wrist that can be broken with your hands.
  • Gather wood over a wide area away from camp. Use dry drift wood on rivers and sea shores.
  • Don’t bring firewood from home. Either buy it from a local source or gather it responsibly where allowed.
  • Burn all wood to white ash, grind small coals to ash between your gloved hands, thoroughly soak with water, and scatter the remains over a large area away from camp. Ashes may have to be packed out in river corridors.
  • Replace soil where you found it when cleaning up a mound or pan fire.
  • Scatter unused wood to keep the area as natural looking as possible.
  • Pack out any campfire litter. Plastic items and foil-lined wrappers should never be burned in a camp fire.

Fire Safety

  • Provide adequate supervision for young people when using stoves or fires.
  • Follow all product and safety labels for stoves.
  • Use approved containers for fuel.
  • Never leave a fire unattended.
  • Keep wood and other fuel sources away from fire.
  • Thoroughly extinguish all fires.

Taken from www.lnt.org.  See more at: https://lnt.org/learn/principle-5#sthash.4DbzezMB.dpuf

Join me on Saturday June 13th for a Leave No Trace Awareness Workshop or later this summer for a Leave No Trace Trainer Workshop!

DennisonTeachingStay safe and happy trails,

Dennison Webb, M.A.
Founder | Executive Director

Idaho Gives BIG in 2015!

Screen Shot 2015-05-09 at 7.43.49 PM As the Idaho Gives saying goes – when we are ALL in, we ALL win!
This was no exception on May 7th, 2015 when I had the pleasure of witnessing local nonprofits in Bonner County, Idaho come together to work towards the common goal of supporting Idaho Gives – an annual 24-hour day of giving online for Idaho nonprofits.  It is not often that we have the time to take pause and come together to do some good, so experiencing this community-based grassroots effort was meaningful.  Together we were able to share our work to our stakeholders in Sandpoint, Hope, Bonner’s Ferry, Coeur d’ Alene and other North Idaho communities at Idaho Gives ‘donations stations’ and local events, including stops at our gracious hosts Evans Brothers Coffee Roasters and the Idaho Pour Authority.  Overall, Idahoans should be proud.  During Idaho Gives donors did in fact ‘GIVE’ to Idaho nonprofits totaling over $1,000,000 donated throughout our great state!  

As part of Idaho Gives, SOLE was the recipient of (2) separate ‘donation awards’ (i.e., financial awards given out periodically by the Idaho Nonprofit Center when people donate throughout the day). Specifically, two of the donations we received won a $500 ‘Golden Ticket Award’, as well as, a $250 ‘Donor Appreciation Award’. These awards brought our grand total to $2,016.00 received during Idaho Gives 2015!  As a grassroots, voulnteer-driven nonprofit we view this as a great day because some local area youth will now be able to explore, achieve, and lead through the transformational experiential and outdoor education programs we provide.  Specifically, these funds will be placed in the SOLE Youth Scholarship Fund – a scholarship fund for local area schools and individuals to participate in SOLE programming.

As we wind down Idaho Gives, I want to personally thank everyone involved from our volunteers, our board members, our partnering Bonner County nonprofits, and especially those that donated to our cause during Idaho Gives.  Because of your continued support we are able to work towards our goal to ‘reach and teach’ 1,000 more youth through the transformational experiential and outdoor education programs that we provide.  As we move towards summer please follow me on the trail via our eNewsletter and our blog at:  https://www.soleexperiences.org/sole-blog/ 

Sincerely,
Dennison Webb, M.A.
Founder | Executive Director