SOLE’s Youth Advocate Making a Difference

What was your favorite part of SOLE’s SnowSchool Experience program?

Working with kids was definitely my favorite part of SOLE’s SnowSchool Experience program. Coming from a family that is so passionate about the outdoors, it’s difficult to see kids who don’t have that background and aren’t from families that have those same values. That’s why it’s so special to work with those kids because it allows me to introduce the outdoors to them and get to share those values with them.

SOLE Youth Advocate and Field Instructor, Erin Meek in the snowpit frontloading information for their field notebooks.  Photo Credit:  Dennison Webb

What qualities do you think it takes to make a good SnowSchool Field Instructor at SOLE?

Flexibility is a crucial quality to thrive as a Field Instructor at SOLE. It’s easy to stick to what you know, especially when you become comfortable with a group of students or a set of teaching material, but having different kids each day requires you to be flexible in your leadership and teaching methods. I also think that communication and delegation of tasks are vitally important as an instructor. My leadership style is to control tasks and situations and I tend to want to take on all the tasks, but I learned to trust my team and know that we all are going to accomplish the work that needs to be done. We built off of each other’s strengths and encouraged each other through their weaknesses, and I think that having mutual respect along with love and support for our team was what allowed us to thrive and grow together.

How did SOLE’s SnowSchool Experience program allow you to grow as a leader?

SOLE’s SnowSchool Experience program allowed me to gain independence and confidence as a leader. My biggest weakness is confidence when it comes to leadership situations. Typically I have sustained a supporting leadership role in other aspects of my life, and was used to being a co-leader, but SOLE’s SnowSchool Experience program pushed me into a central leadership role. This allowed me to become confident. I learned that being a leader doesn’t mean you have to do things perfectly. Our team brought leadership down to a human-level where it’s not about being perfect, it’s about doing the best that you can every day. We all came from different backgrounds and all with different strengths. Some of us with science backgrounds, some teaching, some recreation, and all our different backgrounds and personality traits shined in different ways. It made me feel like I brought something to that table as a leader in my own way.

Erin showing that sometimes you got to get “creative” in the field when teaching!  Photo Credit: Dennison Webb

What do you feel was the most challenging aspect of working as an Field Instructor?

Learning and mastering the material and getting the hang of the routine of the day was the most challenging part for me. I think it’s easy to get comfortable talking about the same things each time, but because we always mixed up the tasks of who was teaching what, it required me to broaden my understanding of all the aspects of SOLE’s SnowSchool Experience program. I needed a wide range of knowledge, spanning from tree identification to snowpit protocol, to classroom topics, and have the ability to answer student questions along the way. I had to learn how to explain complex topics to young students and modify my answers for a specific audience of 5th graders. This was challenging because I didn’t want to over or under explain subjects.

5th-grade SnowSchool Experience students thrive when they are exposed to SOLE’s rich and rigorous place-based, experiential education.  Photo Credit: Dennison Webb

What do you value about outdoor experiential education?

I think that experiential education, especially in the outdoors is absolutely phenomenal! The best way to experience anything is through hands-on learning and kids learn so much through being outdoors. I did my senior project on the importance of recess for students and how much it truly matters for developing brains. Kids learn important social skills, and outdoor activities encourage and morph social experiences. Outdoor experiences dramatically improve performance in the classroom and reduce the distracted behavior. SOLE’s SnowSchool Experience program brings that experience one step further, by adding education to outdoor recreation. Students are able to touch, feel, and hypothesize about their environment, and use science to explore those curiosities. They learn how to be apart of a team; how to take care and watch out for one another in a potentially harsh environment, and how to make sure that everyone is included and cared for. I saw kids helping one another in real ways by offering granola bars to other students that are hungry and cold. These kinds of programs are what plant the seed for kids to acknowledge the value and importance of our local mountains and how they affect our daily lives.

Students love Erin’s energetic and fun-loving apporach both in and out of the field! Photo Credit: Dennison Webb

Did SOLE’s SnowSchool Experience program assist with providing experience for you to fulfill your career goals?/What will you take away from this experience?

I strive to one day become a child counselor and my experience with SOLE helped me to learn how to establish relationships with students. Even in the short amount of time I got to spend with the kids it was easy to see which students were living in low income and poverty households. It was those kids that I really tried to reach out to and make sure they had a good experience at SnowSchool. It made me realize that although Sandpoint is small, it is very socioeconomically diverse and it became very apparent when working with students from all around the district and I developed a strong sense of empathy about it as a leader. I learned how to work with young kids, as well as how to work with adults from different walks of life. Our daily debriefs taught me how to be honest with my teammates in a healthy and constructive way. I will definitely carry those skills as I continue on my career path.

What is your favorite snow crystal?

Stellar dendrites and plates!

Through her formal education and passion for the outdoors, Erin served as SOLE’s Youth Advocate & Intern Field Instructor for SOLE’s SnowSchool Experience program during the winter 2018-2019 season.  Erin plans on attending the University of Montana in Missoula; studying Cognitive Neuroscience and Social Work, working to become a Clinical Counselor.

Interested in becoming a Youth Advocate or Field Instructor?  Contact us today or apply here.

What’s up with the Rec | Pro Split?

Truth be told, it’s been a long time coming.  Yep you guessed it – avalanche education in the United States has just made a major shift.  As an educator that values consistency in teaching and outcomes for students – I’d say the avalanche education Rec | Pro split is for the better. Thanks impart to a partnership between the American Avalanche Association (AAA) and the leading avalanche education providers throughout the nation including the American Institute for Avalanche Research and Education (AIARE), American Avalanche Institute (AAI), and the National Avalanche School the avalanche education industry will be moving towards more continuity (similar to our Canadian neighbors).

What actually is the Rec | Pro Split, and why is it necessary?

The former avalanche education progression was quite cumbersome, which included the Level 1, Level 2, Level 3 progression for all users despite individualized needs.  Blending the recreation user with the professional is challenging for both the educator and student alike due to the varying needs related to course content and student outcomes.   Needless to say, we were thrilled to hear that these two “tracks” will now be separated.  Avalanche education providers, like SOLE’s AIARE avalanche education program, will now offer Rec track avalanche education course offerings, which are required to progress to the Pro track whereas Pro track offerings will be offered by the over-arching providers like AIARE, AAI, etc (see the image below for more information).

With these shifts, we look forward to more positive outcomes for participants that take our AIARE courses this season and have needed the Pro | Rec split in the industry for some time.  In addition, to the advantages of separating the two avalanche education user-types, providers and the governing body (AAA) have come together to create more consistency across the industry, akin to what has occurred with wilderness medicine providers and the Wilderness Medical Society.  The results will surely be impactful for all.  Instead of recreational users getting bogged down in the microscopic details of snow crystallography they will now be able to focus on the concepts that really matter at that specific level.  Conversely, avalanche professionals (forecasters, ski guides, etc) will now have the opportunity to “geek out” when needed and have a common interest while doing so!

Some take home points…

  • What is the difference between AAA and AIARE, and how does SOLE fit in the mix?  In simple terms, AAA develops the guidelines for avalanche education providers in the United States.  AIARE is an approved avalanche education provider and takes the guidelines developed by AAA and has developed rigorous, standardized training and curriculum for both pro courses and rec courses which is evidence-based.   This is exactly why SOLE chose the AIARE avalanche education program.  SOLE’s AIARE Field Instructors are avalanche education professionals and besides teaching AIARE courses for SOLE in the winter often work ski guiding, avalanche forecasting, or ski patrolling.  SOLE is an AIARE approved avalanche education provider.
  • Which track is for me, Rec or Pro?  Well, it depends.  Recreational avalanche education is for those who want to make sound decisions in the backcountry.  For example, developing essential skills like determining if you should ski the slope or not is something that you would explore in the Rec track.  On the other hand, the Pro track is for those who would like to pursue or those who are actively working in a professional setting.  Examples include, but not limited to, mitigation work, avalanche forecasting, ski guiding, etc.  It is important to note,  Rec coursework is required to progress to Pro Course offerings.  Also, Pro courses are longer in duration and include a formal evaluation as part of the course.
  • Where should I begin my avalanche education?  As old adage, “why fix something if it ain’t broken” rings true. A Rec Level 1 Course is a great starting point, as well as, the BRAND SPANKING NEW one-day Avalanche Rescue course.  Afterwards, if you would like to progress you will need to demonstrate experience in the avalanche field.  Most avalanche education providers recommend a solid year further developing your skills after taking your Level 1, which will allow you to transition to the Rec Level 2 or Pro 1 course depending on specific needs and skills.  The Avalanche Rescue course is a pre-requisite for the Rec Level 2 or Pro 1.
  • If I already have my Level 2, can I just transition to the Pro track? Not so fast.  You will need to take what is called a Bridge Course with an accompanying exam to achieve Pro 1 Certification. This Bridge Course will evaluate your skills from the previous Level 2 training. It is important to note, this opportunity will be offered briefly, and after the initial two years of the new progression, someone with an old Level 2 will need to take and complete a Pro 1 course to pursue the Pro track – so now’s the time to get on it!

SOLE will continue to offer the full breadth of Rec courses for the 2017 – 2018 season, including the brand new Avalanche Rescue course, women’s specific, youth-specific, and adult co-ed Rec Level 1 course offerings!  So stay tuned-in and refresh often on our website and social media sites.  For more information on these courses and to register for any of our avalanche education programs click here.

Hope to see you on the snow,DennisonTeaching
Dennison Webb, M.A.
Founder | Executive Director

 

Are You Suffering From Frequency Drift?

beaconOver the last several years, the number of backcountry users has increased drastically.  There are many reasons why we have seen this increase, but that’s what we will be discussing today, because I don’t think I need to explain the bliss of an un-tracked slope with just you and your friends!

Hopefully by now, most of you know the importance of proper avalanche gear including the (3) essential items — an avalanche transceiver (or beacon), shovel and probe.  That said, your equipment is only as good as proper education.  Here at SOLE, we offer avalanche education courses that allow you to develop outdoor technical skills, including how to use rescue equipment coupled with the opportunity to develop outdoor leadership skills like judgment and decision-making.  Still the reality is we should all “plan ahead and prepare” and be ready to respond appropriately. Besides organizations like SOLE, ski resorts, land managers, guiding companies, avalanche centers, and backcountry forums are becoming increasingly better at educating backcountry users the risks associated with backcountry travel and the necessary gear and education to manage those risks.  So for now let’s say you have a working understanding of how to use your avalanche beacon.

One thing we should ask ourselves is this; does your beacon still work?  Beacons talk to each other by transmitting at the same frequency.  As long as both beacon frequencies are within a specific range, they will continue to talk.  There have been numerous studies, however, indicating what’s known as “frequency drift”. Frequency drift can happen when your beacon gets extremely hot or cold, if there is physical damage to your beacon and age.  Older beacons were made from fairly inexpensive parts that age just like us.  When this happens, they can “drift” out of their programmed frequency making it impossible for other beacons to find their signal.

IMG_5943

Luckily, there is a very quick and efficient trick to make sure your and your partner’s beacons still works, practice.

So your Tuesday’s Tech Tip for the Trail is to get your beacons out and practice with those you will likely go out with.  This not only gives you practice before the snow flies, but allows you to see if your beacons function the way they were designed and ensures that you or your buddies beacon hasn’t “drifted” out of range.  Put some fresh batteries in before your practice day and you’ll be prepared for the first snow of the season!

Don’t hesitate to ask any questions about frequency drift, beacons, avalanche gear or anything else you might have questions with!

SOLE Ramps Up for Another Winter Season!

It’ll be here before you know it, that little white stuff will fall from the sky and begin to shape our landscape into a winter wonderland!  As such, we are already in high-gear ramping up for another great winter season.  So check out what we have in store for our 2015-2016 winter season thus far.

 

 

 

For starters, we will continue and expand our SnowSchool Experience SM programIMG_6562 at Schweitzer Mountain Resort where we will offer a novel K-12 place-based experiential education curriculum which will focuses on the (5) cornerstones of snow science, winter ecology, avalanche awareness, outdoor living, and outdoor leadership.  During the 2015-2016 winter season our Schweitzer SnowSchool Experience SM site is positioned to serve over 300 + youth this winter – resulting in over 2,400 hours of transformational experiential education programming outdoors for North Idaho youth!   It should be noted, as part of this effort SOLE will be working with the brand-spanking new Clark Fork Junior High School / High School Outdoor Track, which we are really excited about! In addition, SOLE personnel are in the process of developing several pilot programs at our new field campuses at Lookout Pass, and Mt. Spokane.  More information will be shared as development continues, so please check back often.

Learn more about our SnowSchool Experience SM program by going here.  

DSCN0357In addition, SOLE is looking forward to continue to offer avalanche education program offerings for our local and regional stakeholders.  These courses will include our AIARE Level 1, and AIARE Level 2 Courses, as well as, several new course offerings.  During our Level 1 weekends, SOLE will also offer a AIARE Level 1 Refresher for those looking to freshen up their winter backcountry skills.  In addition, for the average outdoor enthusiasts (i.e., snowmobilers, snowshoers, etc.) looking to just become more ‘backcountry aware’ in the winter we will be offering Avalanche Awareness Courses.

Learn more about our Avalanche Education Experience SM program by going here.  

To help us design, coordinate, and facilitate these high quality transformational experiences we are very excited to announce that will be partnering with various organizations, business and have even extended the SOLE family to include some exceptional Field Instructors, including AIARE Course Leader and Director of the Wallowa Avalanche Center, Kip Rand.  To learn more about him and the rest of our Field Instructors please go here, and be sure to check back frequently as we continue to deepen our winter faculty pool.